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What Is The Best Water Filter For An Apartment, Condo, Or Second Home?

Analies Dyjak @ Saturday, February 25, 2017 at 10:12 pm -0500

Hydroviv's Science Team   

If you're looking for a water filter for your apartment, condo, or vacation home your options might be limited. However, you shouldn't be forced to settle for ineffective pitcher or fridge filters that don’t remove things like lead, PFAS, or chromium 6. These are the big things to consider when shopping for a water filter for your apartment or rental home.

Universal Connections

You probably don't want to change out the kitchen faucet in a place that you are renting, so you’ll want to make sure that your water filter connects to the existing faucet and cold water valve with universal faucet connections. Nearly all faucets in the US use a 3/8” compression fitting to connect to the cold-water shutoff valve, so make sure that the inlet and outlets use that size connection.

Size

Many apartments and condos in cities like New York City or Washington, D.C. have smaller under sink spaces than what are found in larger homes. When you are shopping for water filters, you’ll need to take size into account, especially if your unit has a garbage disposal that takes up a bunch of space under your sink. Most reverse osmosis systems are bulky and have large storage tanks, and will not fit under the sink of many apartments. 

Deposit Considerations

Many water filtration systems for apartments require that you drill a hole in your drain line, or that you drill a hole in your counter top. Obviously, if you do either of those things, you won’t get your deposit back, so most people don’t opt for reverse osmosis systems that require a drilled connection to your drain. It can also be difficult to get a plumber to a more remote location if you're looking to install a Reverse Osmosis filter in a second home. 

Portability

When you rent your home, you want to make sure that your water filter can be taken with you when it’s time to move. Make sure that your apartment water filter un-installs very easily, so you don’t leave it behind in the frantic move out!

Hydroviv’s custom water filters are engineered with renters in mind. Its housing fits in small spaces and connects to existing faucets with screw on, screw off connections in 15 minutes, no plumbing experience needed, and we provide an easy water filter installation guide to help you along the way. When it’s time to move or close up camp for the season, Hydroviv water filters can be pulled in about 5 minutes, and the unit’s plumbing can be put back to how it was when you got there. 

Other Great Articles We Think You'll Enjoy:
Pittsburgh is in The Midst of a City-Wide Lead Contamination Problem
Why Your TDS Meter Isn't Telling You Anything Useful
The Lead Problem In New York City Tap Water That Nobody Is Talking About

4 Things To Know Before Testing Your Home’s Water For Lead

Eric Roy @ Thursday, December 29, 2016 at 12:58 am -0500

Eric Roy, Ph.D.  |  Scientific Founder

Since the lead crisis in Flint put lead contamination in the national spotlight, our Tech Support Team is frequently asked questions about testing a home’s water for lead.   Many who reach out to us do so after having been duped by "testing companies" looking to make a quick buck.  This article discusses how to test your home's water for lead accurately & cost-effectively.  

Check For Free City Programs

Some large cities (like Washington DC, NYC, Chicago) have programs in place where residents can submit samples to the city for free lead testing.  We strongly encourage people to take advantage of this free service if it's available to them.  

Ignore Marketing Gimmicks And Find An Accredited Laboratory For Lead Testing

Most of the consumer “test kits” you find at hardware stores or large online retailers are almost always for low cost “screening” tests that are notorious for false alarms and inconclusive results, which allows the lab to upsell you on a more sensitive and accurate test.  Don't be fooled by marketing claims that a kit is "EPA Recognized" or "Tests to EPA Standards"... they don't mean anything.  With lead, you should simply find an accredited water quality lab in your area, and request their test kit.   We recommend finding a lab that uses EPA Method 200.8, which is an Inductively Coupled Plasma, Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) based method that gives accurate results at low concentrations.  

Sample Properly From The Faucet 

Because lead contamination occurs when water sits in lead-containing plumbing pipes, solder, and connections, it’s important that you sample from the faucet and collect at a time when your home’s water has not been used for at least 6 hours (like first thing in the morning)

We recommend collecting 3 samples:  one as soon as you turn on the faucet (also known as a "first draw"), and separate samples after the water has been running for 30 seconds, and 2 minutes.   The reason for collecting multiple samples in this interval is to sample water that sat overnight in different parts of the home’s plumbing and service line. 

Get Help Interpreting Lead Test Results

If all samples come back at zero, you’re probably in the clear for lead.  This is a good thing!

If any of the samples come back above zero, the interpretation gets quite a bit more complicated because EPA’s statements on lead toxicity and regulations are not in alignment.  On one hand, EPA states that there is no safe level of lead, which would imply that lead concentrations should be zero.  However, EPA has established a 15 ppb “Action Level” for lead… which most people (and some media outlets) interpret to mean “if my water is under 15 ppb, it’s safe.”  Unfortunately, that’s simply not true, because the 15 ppb Action Level threshold was established to tell whether or not city-wide corrosion control measures are having problems, not if a single sample contains too much lead.  Furthermore, the EPA allows for up to 10% of samples collected under the Lead and Copper Rule to test above the 15 part per billion Action Level (with no upper limit), and the city remains in compliance.

The reality is, if your water has lead in it after letting water sit in pipes for 6 hours or more, we highly recommend taking steps to reduce exposure, whether it's using a point of use water filter that is rated to remove lead, or allowing your water to run for 2 minutes before using it for drinking, cooking, or washing food.  

We encourage everyone to take advantage of Hydroviv’s “Help No Matter What” approach to Technical Support when it comes to water.  Even though we do not offer lead testing, our water quality experts are happy to give advice through all stages of the lead testing process, free of charge, to make sure that you get answers in the most efficient way possible.  We do not take money from test labs for referrals.

Related Articles:

Does New York City Tap Water Expose More People To Lead Than Flint?
Pittsburgh's Lead Level Exceeds EPA Limits In 2016

Does Your Home's Pre-2014 Plumbing Contain Lead?

Things To Know Before Replacing Your Home's Lead Service Pipe

Goodwin Media Collaborator @ Tuesday, November 15, 2016 at 10:00 pm -0500

6.1 million homes in the United States still use have a functioning Lead Service Line to deliver municipal water into homes. The US Senate recently approved more than $100M to be spent on replacing lead service pipes for homes in Flint. While lead pipe replacement programs can be a great long-term solution to eliminate a source of lead contamination, it doesn’t make all problems go away. Here's the lead water service pipe information you need to know if you are considering replacing your home's lead service pipe:

Service Pipe Replacement Is A Shared Responsibility

The Lead Service Line (LSL) connects the public supply to an individuals homes. In most cases, the city owns the section of pipe up to the property line, but the section on the homeowner’s property belongs to the homeowner. The diagram below (from DC Water’s website) shows how a homes' LSL (also called a water service pipe) connects the city's water main to a private home. When it comes to replacing a Lead Service Line, some cities (including Washington DC) have programs in place to coordinate efforts so the private and public sections can be replaced at the same time.

Lead Service Line Diagram

Lead Concentrations Often Go Up For Months After Replacing A Lead Service Pipe

It seems counter-intuitive, but lead levels typically go up for at least a few months (and sometimes over a year) after a lead service line is replaced. This is because the protective coating/buildup inside the lead pipe is disturbed, and the debris/freshly uncovered pipe surface can contaminate the water with lead. While this spike in lead levels is largest when a service line is partially replaced, we also have users who have seen a spike in lead levels after a complete service line replacement.

Your Home Can Still Have Lead In Its Plumbing

If a home is old enough to have a lead water service pipe, there is a good chance that there is lead somewhere else in the home's plumbing as well. While most cities stopped installing lead service pipes in the 1950s-1960s, residential plumbing standards lagged behind for several decades. For example, in plumbing that predates 1986, solder used to join copper pipes commonly contained 50% lead (it’s actually called 50/50 solder). Since then, there have been reductions in the amount of lead that can be used in residential plumbing connections and fixtures, with the most recent phase out taking place in 2014.

Lead Can Be Introduced 'Downstream' Of A Water Filter

This seems obvious, but it’s something that’s often forgotten when people inquire about whole house filters. This is why we recommend that people who are looking to filter lead from their water install a filter at the point of use (connected to the faucet), not at the point where the water enters the home.

Should You Replace Your Home's Lead Service Pipe?

For the reasons listed above, we highly recommend that people treat replacing their home's lead service pipe as part of an overall lead reduction strategy, not as a silver bullet. If a person decides to replace the lead home water service pipe, we also recommend using point of use custom water filters for all faucets used for drinking, and to monitor lead levels in their home's water for 18 months after the pipe is replaced.

As always, we encourage everyone to take advantage of Hydroviv’s “Help No Matter What” approach to technical support. If you have any questions about lead home water service pipes, water filtration, or water quality in general, our Technical Support Team is happy to answer your questions, even if you have no desire to buy Hydroviv’s products! Drop us a line (Support@hydroviv.com) or use the live chat functionality.

Other Articles We Think You'll Enjoy:
Why TDS Meters Don't Tell You Anything About The Presence of Lead
Does Boiling Or Freezing My Water Remove Lead?
Does New York City Have A Lead Problem?

Should I Use A Shower Filter?

Analies Dyjak @ Monday, July 25, 2016 at 1:29 pm -0400
Eric Roy, Ph.D.  |  Scientific Founder
Until recently, I lived in Maine.  Born, raised, educated, job, house, dogs… all of the things… but not in a large city.  After graduate school, I became involved with projects for work that brought me to chemical and biological weapon facilities in the DC area. After spending my first day in one of these labs, I took a shower in the hotel and found that I had a bright red irritating rash.  Given the types of chemicals I had played with that day, it was pretty terrifying. Long story short… the doctors figured out that my skin irritation was caused by being hypersensitive to chloramine in DC's tap water... not exposure to something much worse. This was an annoyance, but not something that I needed to address at the time, because my trips to the area were relatively infrequent.

About a year ago, I moved to Washington, DC, and learned that a number of my friends (also transplants) used shower water filters because they had similar issues with city water. I also learned from them that the products they used were not living up to claimed longevity and performance.  Because Hydroviv was determining our product roadmap at the time, a heavy-duty shower water filter was added to the planned product line, and we ended up finishing it first.


As I write this, Hydroviv is in the midst of a soft launch while our core drinking water product is being buttoned up, tested, and patented, but we have some early adopters who have chosen to purchase a Hydroviv Shower Filter for a number of reasons.  Here are some of their stories, in no particular order :

  • A Creative Director for a salon in Arizona wants to avoid detrimental effects of chlorinated water on hair and to increase the effectiveness of styling products
  • A model in NYC has noticed that her hair and skin have suffered since moving to NYC, and wanted to improve both
  • A family in Maine wants to remove offensive odors from their well water 
  • Numerous people with sensitive skin (like myself) want to reduce skin irritation that occurs during showering

As always, if you have any questions, send them to info@hydroviv.com or leave a comment below.

Anatomy of DC's Tap Water

Hydroviv Water Quality Assessments @ Monday, July 25, 2016 at 1:38 pm -0400
It may seem strange for a water purification company to write a level-headed blog post about municipal tap water, but you have to give credit where credit is due!  Municipalities are tasked with taking water from the sources like the Potomac River and making it comply with federal drinking water standards, and doing this on an enormous scale.

The Washington Aqueduct (Army Corps of Engineers)and DC Water (District of Columbia Sewer and Water Authority or DC WASA) are the two government entities that produce and distribute Washington D.C.’s tap water.  The Washington Aqueduct collects water from the Potomac River, treats it, and sells it to DC Water, and DC Water is responsible for distributing the water to homes and businesses in DC, as well as maintaining water quality standards along the way.  

Potomacwatershedmap.png
By Kmusser - Own work, Elevation data from SRTM, hydrologic data from the National Hydrography Dataset, urban areas from Vector Map, all other features from the National Atlas., CC BY-SA 3.0

The source of all Washington D.C. tap water is the Potomac River. The Washington Aqueduct transforms untreated water from the Potomac River into the water that flows from our taps.  The multi stage treatment process starts by screening out large objects (e.g. sticks & twigs), and allowing large particles (soil, silt, sand) to settle out naturally. After this step, aluminum sulfate is  mixed into the water, which causes small suspended particles and colloids to aggregate and settle out.  The water is then passed through a large gravity-fed filtration bed comprised of charcoal, sand, and gravel.  After this step, chlorine is added to the water, which kills microorganisms, and ammonia is added, which converts the chlorine to chloramine.  Finally, fluoride (as hexafluorosilicic acid)  and orthophosphate (a corrosion inhibitor) are added, and this water is purchased by DC WASA to distribute to their customers in The District.   

DC WASA does much more than “keeping the pipes flowing” (which with more than 1300 miles of pipe is a logistical feat on its own), they also employ a team of dedicated water quality experts, all working to ensure that water quality meets or exceeds standards set by US EPA.  This means running 24/7 compliance (tests that they are legally obligated to do)  and voluntary (above and beyond) monitoring programs throughout the city.  One interesting aspect of this voluntary program is maintaining mobile laboratories that are staffed with technicians that can be dispatched to investigate emergencies and respond to customer complaints.  

DC WASA also puts a great deal of time and effort into community engagement and public awareness. DC WASA participates in over 100 community outreach events each year to help customers understand the valuable water services they provide.  One example of these programs is the Clean Rivers Project, where DC WASA promotes best practices practices to minimize the amount of sewer overflow that is discharged into D.C.'s waterways.  In addition to managing a water education program for District students, DC WASA hosts annual town hall meetings in every ward of the city.

Throughout my career, I’ve had the opportunity to work with a number of municipalities (both large and small), and DC WASA does a very good job with information transparency.  I would encourage all residents to check out their website (www.dcwater.com) for more information, which includes things like: water quality reportsoverall strategic planand the role that residents play in maintaining water quality within their own home.